2020 Australian Open – Women’s Singles Preview

Heading into the 2020 Australian Open, there is a lot of excitement around women’s tennis, and for a number of reasons!

Can Ashleigh Barty, after winning her first Grand Slam title at Roland Garros last year, and the 2019 WTA Finals in Shenzhen, become the first Australian women since Chris O’Neil in 1978 to win the Australian Open?

Can Naomi Osaka defend her Australian Open crown, and become just the fourth woman since the start of 2000 after Jennifer Capriati (2001, 2002), Serena Williams (2009, 2010), and Victoria Azarenka (2012, 2013) to win in consecutive years at Melbourne Park?

Can Simona Halep, after reuniting with coach Darren Cahill, win at a third different Grand Slam in as many years, and go one better than what she did two years ago when she made the final at the 2018 Australian Open, losing in an epic to Caroline Wozniacki?

Can Petra Kvitová back up her amazing and emotional run to the 2019 Australian Open, her first Grand Slam final after coming back from a career-threatening left hand injury suffered while defending herself from an intruder in her home in Czech Republic in late 2016, and win her first Australian Open crown, and her third Grand Slam title overall?

Can Karolína Plíšková win her first Grand Slam title after making the semi-finals at Melbourne Park last year, and making the US Open final back in 2016?

Can Elina Svitolina win her first Grand Slam title after making the semi-finals at Wimbledon and the US Open last year, and Belinda Bencic after making her first Grand Slam semi-final at Flushing Meadows in 2019?

However, the most poignant question heading into the 2020 Australian Open is whether Serena Williams, fresh off winning her 73rd career title, her first as a mother, and her first since the 2017 Australian Open, can at last equal Margaret Court’s all-time record of 24 Grand Slam titles in the year Court celebrates her 50th anniversary of completing the calendar year Grand Slam?

So, who will win the Daphne Akhurst Memorial Cup in 2020?

Here is my analysis of the 2020 Australian Open women’s singles draw!

 

Section One

The World No.1 Barty, who claimed her first professional tournament victory on Australian soil yesterday in Adelaide, should have little issue in reaching the fourth round and the second week of her home Grand Slam where she will meet either Alison Riske, who defeated Barty in the fourth round to reach the quarter-finals at Wimbledon last year, 2018 Wimbledon semi-finalist Julia Görges, or Petra Martić, who made the Roland Garros quarter-finals in 2019, although Barty will need to be wary of Aliaksandra Sasnovich or Elena Rybakina, who won the Hobart International yesterday, in the third round.

However, you cannot see Barty not making the quarter-finals, and if she hits her absolute top form in the second week, it could a golden event at Melbourne Park for Australia!

My predicted fourth round match-up: (1) Ashleigh Barty vs. (13) Petra Martić

 

Section Two

Two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitová should have no real issues to reach the fourth round, although she will need to be wary of Ekaterina Alexandrova in the third round, who won her first career title a couple of weeks ago in Shenzhen. However, who Kvitová will meet in the fourth round is up for debate with the 2017 US Open finalist Madison Keys having a tough first round match against Daria Kasatkina, who made the quarter-finals at both Roland Garros and Wimbledon in 2018, before a potential third round with either 2014 US Open semi-finalist Peng Shuai, or Maria Sakkari, who won her first career title last year in Morocco.

However, you sense given the form that she showed in Brisbane, especially in defeating Kvitová in the semi-finals, that she will get through to the fourth round for a re-match with last year’s Australian Open finalist. However, can Keys, a semi-finalist at Melbourne Park in 2015, make a really deep run into the second week of a Grand Slam and reach her full potential in 2020? Staying fit and motivated will be the key for her!

My predicted fourth round match-up: (10) Madison Keys vs. (7) Petra Kvitová

 

Section Three

Defending champion Osaka has a deceptively tough draw in front of her with Marie Bouzková who made the semi-finals at the Rogers Cup in Toronto last year, in the first round, Zheng Saisai in the second round, and either seven-time Grand Slam champion Venus Williams, 15 year old American Coco Gauff, who qualified for the main draw at Wimbledon before defeating Venus Williams in the first round and will meet yet again in the first round at the Australian Open, 2009 Roland Garros quarter-finalist Sorana Cîrstea, or 2019 Wimbledon semi-finalist Barbora Strýcová, who failed to make it beyond the first round at her other three Grand Slam main draw appearances in 2019. This is before meeting either 2017 US Open champion Sloane Stephens, 2016 Australian Open quarter-finalist Zhang Shuai, 2011 US Open champion Samantha Stosur, or the highly-talented Sofia Kenin, who won her first three career titles last year, in the fourth round.

Despite how arduous the draw ahead looks for Osaka, you sense she is in strong enough form to overcome all of the challengers in this section to make the quarter-final, and to make a genuine fist of defending her Australian Open crown!

My predicted fourth round match-up: (3) Naomi Osaka vs. (14) Sofia Kenin

 

Section Four

This section features arguably the greatest tennis player (male or female) of all-time in Serena Williams, and the seven-time Australian Open champion shouldn’t have many problems in reaching the fourth round, although she will need to be wary of Wang Qiang in the third round, who of course defeated Barty in the fourth round of last year’s US Open.

This section also features 2018 Australian Open champion Caroline Wozniacki, who will be retiring from professional tennis after the 2020 Australian Open, and she has a tough run with 19 year old Dayana Yastremska, who made the final in Adelaide and has won three career titles, in the second round, and then three-time Grand Slam semi-finalist Johanna Konta, or 2017 Roland Garros quarter-finalist Caroline Garcia in third round before potentially a final-ever meeting, an emotional occasion with her great friend Serena, which other than winning a second Australian Open title, would be close to the perfect way to say goodbye!

However, back to Serena, can she at last equal Margaret Court’s all-time record of 24 Grand Slam singles titles at the 2020 Australian Open? Given the form she showed to win in Auckland, she has a very strong chance, but it won’t be easy!

My predicted fourth round match-up: Caroline Wozniacki vs. (8) Serena Williams

 

Section Five

This is one of the tougher sections of the draw, but one where I think the two favoured players in last year’s US Open semi-finalist Belinda Bencic, and 2019 WTA Elite Trophy champion Aryna Sabalenka will make it through to the fourth round. However, Bencic will have to overcome 2017 Roland Garros champion Jeļena Ostapenko in the second round, and Anett Kontaveit in the third round, while Sabalenka has to overcome seven-time Grand Slam quarter-finalist Carla Suárez Navarro in the opening round, 18 year old Iga Świątek in the second round, before meeting either 2019 US Open quarter-finalist Donna Vekić, 2008 Australian Open champion Maria Sharapova, who is the shadow of her former self having lost eight of her last 11 official matches, and hasn’t won consecutive matches since the 2019 Australian Open, or Alizé Cornet in the third round.

My predicted fourth round match-up: (6) Belinda Bencic vs. (11) Aryna Sabalenka

 

Section Six

Two-time Grand Slam champion Simona Halep has a tough first round against American Jennifer Brady, who defeated Barty in the second round in Brisbane after Brady went through qualifying in Brisbane, and then a potential third round meeting with last year’s Australian Open semi-finalist Danielle Collins. This is before a potential fourth round meeting with either 2019 US Open quarter-finalist Elise Mertens, British player Heather Watson, American youngster CiCi Bellis, who is on the comeback from various injuries, 2013 Wimbledon semi-finalist Kirsten Flipkens, or 2019 Wimbledon quarter-finalist Karolína Muchová.

However, given that Halep has lost in the first round in four of her nine previous Australian Open main draw appearances, and given the fact that Halep hasn’t gone through consecutive calendar years without losing in the first round of a Grand Slam event, it wouldn’t be a complete surprise if she were to go out before the business end of the tournament.

My predicted fourth round match-up: (16) Elise Mertens vs. (26) Danielle Collins

 

Section Seven

This is a complex section of the draw, but a section where you feel both Elina Svitolina, a quarter-finalist at Melbourne Park for the last two years, and 2016 Roland Garros semi-finalist Kiki Bertens should make it through to meet each other in the fourth round. However, Svitolina will need to beat either two-time Grand Slam champion Garbiñe Muguruza, or 2018 US Open semi-finalist Anastasija Sevastova in the third round, both match-ups not an easy task, while Bertens will have to face 18 year old American Amanda Anisimova, who of course made the semi-finals at Roland Garros last year, but will be playing her first Grand Slam tournament since Wimbledon last year after the tragic passing of her father Konstantin a week before last year’s US Open.

My predicted fourth round match-up: (5) Elina Svitolina vs. (9) Kiki Bertens

 

Section Eight

Last year’s Australian Open semi-finalist Karolína Plíšková has a brutal draw with two-time Grand Slam quarter-finalist Kristina Mladenovic in the first round, a player who has great recent memories of Australia after being the player of the 2019 Fed Cup Final in Perth to help France to their first Fed Cup win since 2003, and their third overall. Plíšková then has 2017 Australian Open semi-finalist and wildcard CoCo Vandeweghe in the second round, five-time Grand Slam quarter-finalist Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova in the third round before meeting fellow countrywoman and 2019 Roland Garros finalist Markéta Vondroušová, who is on the comeback from a wrist injury that kept her out for the back half of 2019 since Wimbledon, or 2016 Australian Open champion Angelique Kerber, who suffered a back injury in Adelaide, in the fourth round.

Vondroušová, before a potential match-up with her fellow Czech in the fourth round, will need to defeat two-time Grand Slam champion Svetlana Kuznetsova in the opening round, 2018 Wimbledon quarter-finalist Camila Giorgi, and Kerber in the third round.

However, the focus is on Plíšková, and if she gets through to the second week, she has her best chance of breaking through for her first Grand Slam title!

My predicted fourth round match-up: (15) Markéta Vondroušová vs. (2) Karolína Plíšková

 

My predicted quarter-final match-ups

(1) Ashleigh Barty vs. (10) Madison Keys

(3) Naomi Osaka vs. (8) Serena Williams

(11) Aryna Sabalenka vs. (26) Danielle Collins

(5) Elina Svitolina vs. (2) Karolína Plíšková

 

My predicted semi-final match-ups

(1) Ashleigh Barty vs. (3) Naomi Osaka

(11) Aryna Sabalenka vs. (2) Karolína Plíšková

 

My predicted final match-up

(1) Ashleigh Barty vs. (2) Karolína Plíšková

 

2020 Australian Open women’s singles champion

(1) Ashleigh Barty

2020 Australian Open – Men’s Singles Preview

Heading into the 2020 Australian Open, there is a lot of intrigue about men’s tennis, and for so many reasons, including the battle for supremacy between Roger Federer (20 Grand Slam titles), Rafael Nadal (19 Grand Slam titles), and Novak Djokovic (16 Grand Slam titles), and the title in many people’s eyes as the greatest male tennis player of all-time!

Can Nadal equal Federer on 20 by winning his second Australian Open and become the first player in the Open Era to win at every Grand Slam at least twice, and join Australian legends Roy Emerson and Rod Laver to have won each Grand Slam at least twice across the amateur and professional eras of the game?

Can Djokovic close the gap between himself and Federer to three by winning his eighth Australian Open, and become the first male player to win the Australian Open in consecutive years on three separate occasions?

Or, can Federer extend his lead to two over Nadal, and five over Djokovic by winning a record-equalling seventh Australian Open, and become the oldest grand slam champion in the Open era, going ahead of Australian legend Ken Rosewall, who won his final grand slam (his eighth overall, and his fourth Australian Open) at the age of 37 years and two months.

And Federer, Nadal, and Djokovic all have the opportunity of joining Rosewall as the only male players to have won Grand Slam titles in three separate decades, and become the first to do so entirely in the Open Era.

However, can anyone else stop these three undisputed all-time greats, and etch their names on the Norman Brookes Challenge Cup?

Here is my analysis of the 2020 Australian Open men’s singles draw!

 

Section One

Despite his form at the ATP Cup where Nadal won four of his six matches, the World No.1 should have no problems in reaching the fourth round at Melbourne Park where he should meet either Karen Khachanov or Nick Kyrgios. Of course Kyrgios carries the hopes of Australia in the men’s singles draw after the withdrawal of Alex de Minaur due to an abdominal injury, but will need to be better than what he was against Roberto Bautista Agut in the ATP Cup semi-final in Sydney if he is to trouble the 2009 Australian Open champion, and potentially make it through to a third Grand Slam quarter-final.

For Nadal though, he will sense that he will have bigger fish to fry, including a potential semi-final against Daniil Medvedev in what would be a re-match of last year’s US Open final, and a potential final up against either Djokovic in a re-match of last year’s Australian Open final, or a re-match of the 2017 Australian Open final against Federer, a match-up which could ultimately decide when it is all said and done, who finishes with the most Grand Slam titles of all-time!

My predicted fourth round match-up: (1) Rafael Nadal vs. (23) Nick Kyrgios

 

Section Two

This is a very competitive section of the draw featuring 2016 Australia Open quarter-finalist Gaël Monfils, former Wimbledon quarter-finalists in Lu Yen-hsun (2010), Ivo Karlović (2009), and Vasek Pospisil (2015), 19 year old sensation Félix Auger-Aliassime, who made three finals on the ATP Tour in 2019, as well as American Taylor Fritz, who defeated Sam Querrey to win his first career title at Eastbourne last year, two-time Grand Slam finalist Kevin Anderson, who showed some great form on his return from a right knee injury at the ATP Cup in Brisbane, 2016 Roland Garros quarter-finalist Albert Ramos Viñolas, Frenchman Adrian Mannarino, who defeated Jordan Thompson to win his first career title in ‘s-Hertogenbosch last year, and two-time Roland Garros finalist in Dominic Thiem.

Given the lack of success from Thiem outside of clay, and the general unpredictability of Monfils among other factors, this section is wide open!

My predicted fourth round match-up: (20) Félix Auger-Aliassime vs. Kevin Anderson

 

Section Three

The 2019 US Open finalist Daniil Medvedev, who was brilliant throughout the ATP Cup, should have little trouble in making it through to the fourth round for a potential meeting with 2014 Australian Open champion Stan Wawrinka, although Medvedev faces last year’s Australian Open quarter-finalist Frances Tiafoe in the first round, and either 2008 Australian Open finalist Jo-Wilfried Tsonga or Australian Alexei Popyrin in the third round, who got past the first round in each of his four Grand Slam appearances last year.

Looking at Wawrinka, he has a tough road to get to Medvedev, with match-ups against Damir Džumhur in the first round, Andreas Seppi or Miomir Kecmanović in the second round, and 2018 Wimbledon semi-finalist John Isner in the third round, and while you sense the three-time Grand Slam champion has another big run left in him, you also sense that it is Medvedev’s time to shine and potentially win his first Grand Slam title.

My predicted fourth round match-up: (4) Daniil Medvedev vs. (15) Stan Wawrinka

 

Section Four

Three-time Grand Slam quarter-finalist David Goffin, and two-time Roland Garros quarter-finalist Alexander Zverev are the favourites from this section to move through to the second week, and meet each other in the fourth round, although face potential banana skins in each round.

Goffin has 2013 Australian Open quarter-finalist Jérémy Chardy in the first round, before facing either Pierre-Hugues Herbert or Cameron Norrie in the second round, before a cracking third round match against Andrey Rublev, who made the quarter-finals at the US Open back in 2017, and just became the first player since Dominik Hrbatý in 2004 to win titles in each of the first two weeks of a new season.

However, given his strong form at the ATP Cup, including defeating Nadal in straight sets in Belgium’s quarter-final loss against Spain in Sydney, Goffin’s aim will be to go really deep into the second week at Melbourne Park, and potentially reach his first Grand Slam semi-final.

Zverev faces Marco Cecchinato in the first round, who other than reaching the semi-finals at Roland Garros in 2018, has failed to progress beyond the first round at each of his other 10 Grand Slam main draw appearances, before facing Casper Ruud in the second round, and then either 2009 Australian Open semi-finalist Fernando Verdasco, or Georgian Nikoloz Basilashvili in the third round. However, given the issues that he has had with his second serve in recent times, this is perhaps not the tournament for Zverev to shine at this time around.

My predicted fourth round match-up: (11) David Goffin vs. (7) Alexander Zverev

 

Section Five

Last year’s US Open semi-finalist Matteo Berrettini should have no issues in making the third round, where he will meet either last year’s Australian Open semi-finalist Sam Querrey, or Borna Ćorić, before a potential all-Italian fourth round meeting with Fabio Fognini. However, Fognini has to overcome the highly-dangerous, big serving, and huge American in Reilly Opelka in the first round, and 2019 Wimbledon quarter-finalist Guido Pella in the third round before contemplating a meeting with his fellow countryman early in the second week.

My predicted fourth round match-up: (8) Matteo Berrettini vs. (12) Fabio Fognini

 

Section Six

Despite coming into the 2020 Australian Open with no official matches under his belt at the start of this year, you feel like Federer should have little trouble in reaching the second week once again, although he will have to be wary of Hubert Hurkacz in the third round, who was impressive for Poland at the ATP Cup, before meeting either the explosive Denis Shapovalov, or three-time Grand Slam semi-finalist Grigor Dimitrov, with that third round encounter between the Canadian and the Bulgarian set to be an exhilarating battle.

However, back to Federer, can he make the semi-finals, and then defeat Djokovic, and then defeat Nadal in the final to claim his 21st Grand Slam singles title, and maybe secure his place as probably the greatest male tennis player of all-time? Only time will tell!

My predicted fourth round match-up: (18) Grigor Dimitrov vs. (3) Roger Federer

 

Section Seven

Last year’s Australian Open semi-finalist Stefanos Tsitsipas should have little difficulty in reaching the third round to face 2016 Wimbledon finalist Milos Raonic, who is on the rebound from a back injury which kept him out of the 2019 Davis Cup Finals in Madrid, but Tsitsipas faces a potential banana skin in 2012 Wimbledon quarter-finalist Philipp Kohlschreiber in the second round before his meeting with the Canadian in the third round ahead of a potential fourth round classic with 2019 Wimbledon semi-finalist Roberto Bautista Agut, who has really been in career-best form, particularly at the ATP Cup where he didn’t lose a match.

However, the Spaniard has to face fellow countryman and four-time Grand Slam quarter-finalist Feliciano López, and then either Benoît Paire or 2014 US Open champion Marin Čilić in the third round before a meeting with Tsitsipas.

However, given the amazing form of Bautista Agut, Tsitsipas will have his work cut out if he is to match his performance last year at Melbourne Park, and maybe restore the respect of his parents after his antics in the match against Nick Kyrgios at the ATP Cup in Brisbane.

My predicted fourth round match-up: (6) Stefanos Tsitsipas vs. (9) Roberto Bautista Agut

 

Section Eight

Fresh off leading Serbia to the inaugural ATP Cup crown, and winning each of his singles matches during the event, Novak Djokovic should have no problems in reaching the second week of the 2020 Australian Open, with three-time Grand Slam quarter-finalist Diego Schwartzman likely to be his greatest challenge before the quarter-finals, but the greater question is can Djokovic go onto win his eighth Australian Open, and his 17th Grand Slam title to close the gap to Nadal and Federer? Few would bet against him, but nothing can be taken for granted, especially against Federer in a semi-final, and Nadal in a final.

My predicted fourth round match-up: (14) Diego Schwartzman vs. (2) Novak Djokovic

 

My predicted quarter-final match-ups

(1) Rafael Nadal vs. (20) Félix Auger-Aliassime

(4) Daniil Medvedev vs. (11) David Goffin

(8) Matteo Berrettini vs. (3) Roger Federer

(9) Roberto Bautista Agut vs. (2) Novak Djokovic

 

My predicted semi-final match-ups

(1) Rafael Nadal vs. (4) Daniil Medvedev

(3) Roger Federer vs. (2) Novak Djokovic

 

My predicted final match-up

(1) Rafael Nadal vs. (3) Roger Federer

 

2020 Australian Open men’s singles champion

(3) Roger Federer

2019 Australian Open – Men’s Singles Preview

The 2019 Australian Open is just about here, and we have got an exciting fortnight coming up from Melbourne Park, potentially an historic one with both Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer looking to become the first player to win the Australian Open seven times.

Federer is also looking to claim his third-straight crown at Melbourne Park after defeating Rafael Nadal in 2017 and Marin Čilić in 2018 (both in five sets), and with that become the first male player, and the third player overall across both sexes (Serena Williams and Helen Wills Moody) to win two separate Grand Slam singles events at least seven times.

While Djokovic, who after Madrid in 2018, when he had just six wins and six losses for the season, and struggling to find his way after having elbow surgery after the 2018 Australian Open, won 47 of his last 53 matches in 2018 to reclaim the World No.1 ranking after slipping to 22nd in the world just before Roland Garros, returning to the top 10 after winning for the fourth time at the All England Club, and became the first end of year World No.1 not have won a title before Wimbledon in the same year. He will be looking to return to the form of his past glories at Melbourne Park after failing to make the quarter-finals in the last two years.

However, the 2019 Australian Open is not just about Roger and Novak, with Rafael Nadal, who had surgery to remove a floating piece of bone in his ankle after pulling out of 2018 ATP World Tour Finals due to an abdominal strain, looking to win his second Australian Open, and become just the third male player to win each Grand Slam singles event at least twice. Nadal has retired or withdraw from 17 of his last 18 official hard court tournaments (which included Davis Cup) that he was entered in, including withdrawing from his last seven.

Then we have the comebacks of Andy Murray from his hip problems, and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga from a knee injury, and then the potential challengers to Novak, Rafa, and Roger in Alexander Zverev, Kevin Anderson, Marin Čilić, Dominic Thiem, and Kei Nishikori among others who could challenge for the first Grand Slam title of 2019.

However, will there be a twist or two during the next fortnight? Let’s analyse the men’s singles draw.

 

Section One

Djokovic will face a qualifier in the opening round before facing either Tsonga, who he defeated to win his first Australian Open back in 2008, or Martin Kližan in the second round. Djokovic is slated to face the promising and talented Denis Shapovalov in the third round, before facing David Goffin or Daniil Medvedev, who had the most hard court wins in 2018 with 32, compared to Djokovic with 31, at the start of the second week, but assuming he is fit and healthy, no one is going to stop Djokovic going deep into the second week here.

My fourth round match-up: (1) Novak Djokovic vs. (15) Daniil Medvedev

 

Section Two

Nishikori is the clear favourite to make it through this section, and meet Djokovic in the quarter-finals after climbing from 22nd to 9th in the world in 2018, but faces an awkward second round against big serving veteran Ivo Karlović, before facing Philipp Kohlschreiber in the third round, and then either Fabio Fognini or Pablo Carreño Busta in the fourth round. In saying this, this section is easier on paper than Section One, and should pose no issues for the 2014 US Open finalist.

My fourth round match-up: (23) Pablo Carreño Busta vs. (8) Kei Nishikori

 

Section Three

Zverev, who won four titles in 2018, including the ATP World Tour Finals, should make it through at least to the fourth round, where he will have a shot of making just his second grand slam quarter-final, but the first round match-ups which stand out are the ones between Stan Wawrinka and Ernests Gulbis, and Nick Kyrgios and Milos Raonic, with the winners of each playing each other in the second round, with the winner of that to play last year’s Australian Open semi-finalist Hyeon Chung, who missed both Roland Garros and Wimbledon due to an ankle injury, who could face Sam Querrey in the second round, potentially the only roadblock to a blockbuster third round, and then potential Round of 16 with Zverev.

My fourth round match-up: (4) Alexander Zverev vs. (24) Hyeon Chung

 

Section Four

On paper, it looks like a comfortable section for the 2018 Roland Garros finalist Thiem, who made his first Grand Slam quarter-final outside of Roland Garros at the US Open, where he was beaten by Nadal in a epic five set match on Arthur Ashe Stadium, but faces Benoît Paire in the opening round before facing 2017 Australian Open quarter-finalist Mischa Zverev, who defeated Murray in the fourth round as Murray’s physical issues started to become evident on-route to being subsequently smashed by Federer in the quarter-final, and then Lucas Pouille in the third round before a fourth round encounter with Borna Ćorić. The only real obstacle for Ćorić will be Marco Cecchinato in the third round, who became the first Italian to make a Grand Slam semi-final in 40 years at Roland Garros last year after defeating Djokovic in what was a huge upset.

My fourth round match-up: (11) Borna Ćorić vs. (7) Dominic Thiem

 

Section Five

This is a really intriguing section of the draw with a big first round match-up between last year’s Australian Open finalist Čilić, and 2011 Wimbledon quarter-finalist Bernard Tomic, who has made the fourth round at Melbourne Park, and according to former Australian tennis player Paul McNamee believes Tomic is in best form for five years, around the time when Čilić and Tomic last met back in 2015 at Montreal, a match which Tomic won in the lead up to the 2015 US Open, where Čilić made the semi-finals in the defence of his 2014 crown. And, although Čilić made the final here last year, he has only made the quarter-finals or better here twice, making the semi-finals back in 2010, where Čilić defeated Tomic in a five set struggle in the second round. If there was to be a big upset in the opening round, this is the match where it could happen.

Regardless, the winner of this match-up could make it through to the third round to face Fernando Verdasco before a fourth round meeting with either Karen Khachanov, last year’s quarter-finalist Tennys Sandgren, Roberto Bautista Agut, or Murray. Both Bautista Agut and Murray face each other in the opening round in what is going to be a tough match for Murray, who has only played 14 matches in his comeback so far, and has announced his intention to retire from the sport at some point in 2019 due to his ongoing hip problems. I think patience is going to be the better part of valour over the next couple of months if Murray is to make a truly successful comeback.

My fourth round match-up: Bernard Tomic vs. (10) Karen Khachanov

 

Section Six

Federer, although he faces Denis Istomin in the opening round, who of course defeated Djokovic in the second round two years ago, and Gaël Monfils in the third round, should have no problems making it to the Round of 16 to meet Greek youngster Stefanos Tsitsipas, who gave Federer some trouble over at the Hopman Cup in Perth. In saying this though, Federer is certainly a strong chance of going deep into the second week, and perhaps winning his 21st Grand Slam title.

My fourth round match-up: (14) Stefanos Tsitsipas vs. (3) Roger Federer

 

Section Seven

This is one of the more stronger sections of the draw with Anderson a chance of reuniting with John Isner in the fourth round in what would be re-match of the 2018 Wimbledon semi-final, which was the second-longest match in Wimbledon history, but has to get past Adrian Mannarino in the opening round, Frances Tiafoe in the second round, and either Steve Johnson, Andreas Seppi, or Feliciano López in the third round.

However, Isner has obstacles of his own to overcome as well, facing his fellow giant American Reilly Opelka in the first round, and then Grigor Dimitrov in third round, who looks to be returning close to his best after making the quarter-finals in Brisbane.

My fourth round match-up: (5) Kevin Anderson vs. (20) Grigor Dimitrov

 

Section Eight

Nadal, despite his fitness clouds, should have no problems making it through to the third round to play Alex de Minaur, who won his first ATP title in Sydney, and could meet either last year’s semi finalist Kyle Edmund, 2011 Wimbledon finalist Tomáš Berdych, or Diego Schwartzman in the fourth round. Both Edmund and Berdych will face each other in a blockbuster opening round, while Schwartzman should have little trouble in making the third round.

In any case, I can’t see anyone in this section right now capable of denying Nadal a passage through to the second week, and a shot at a second Australian Open crown.

My fourth round match-up: (18) Diego Schwartzman vs. (2) Rafael Nadal

 

My predicted quarter-final match-ups

(1) Novak Djokovic vs. (8) Kei Nishikori

(4) Alexander Zverev vs. (7) Dominic Thiem

(10) Karen Khachanov vs. (3) Roger Federer

(20) Grigor Dimitrov vs. (2) Rafael Nadal

 

My predicted semi-final match-ups

(1) Novak Djokovic vs. (4) Alexander Zverev

(3) Roger Federer vs. (2) Rafael Nadal

 

My predicted final

(1) Novak Djokovic vs. (3) Roger Federer

 

2019 Australian Open champion prediction

(3) Roger Federer

2019 Australian Open – Women’s Singles Preview

The 2019 Australian Open is just about here, and we have got an exciting fortnight coming up from Melbourne Park, and the dominating theme in regards to the women’s draw is the return of Serena Williams to the Australian Open for the first time since having her first child Alexis Olympia.

Of course Williams won the 2017 Australian Open when she was eight weeks pregnant, and will play her first official tournament since last year’s US Open, when she lost to Naomi Osaka, a final dominated by the whole controversy with the code violation from Carlos Ramos for the coaching she received from Patrick Mouratoglou, and the whole argument from Serena that she has never cheated in her life, and the meltdown in her performance after that. If Williams were to win the 2019 Australian Open, it would be her first title since her victory at Melbourne Park two years ago, and she would equal Margaret Court’s record of 24 Grand Slam titles.

However, she is not the only contender, with the four grand slam winners of 2018 in Caroline Wozniacki, Simona Halep, Angelique Kerber, and Osaka looking to start 2019 in the best possible way.

The defending champion Wozniacki won three titles last year, but struggled after winning the second of those titles at Eastbourne, winning just seven of her next 13 matches, and later revealed that she was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis prior to the US Open, right in the middle of this poor form streak, while last year’s runner-up Halep finished as the end of year World No.1 for the second year in a row after winning her first grand slam title at Roland Garros after defeating Sloane Stephens in the final.

Kerber, who defeated Williams in the Wimbledon final in 2018 to win her third Grand Slam title, returned back to her best form after winning no titles in 2017, claiming two titles last year as she climbed from 21st at the start of the year back up to 2nd, and within striking distance of the No.1 ranking, while Osaka emerged to win her first career title at Indian Wells, and then claiming the US Open crown as she firmly secured her place as a Top 10 player.

Then we have the likes of Stephens, Elina Svitolina, Karolína Plíšková, and Petra Kvitová among others who are capable of challenging the five players above, and potentially take home the first Grand Slam of 2019.

But, could there be a surprise on the horizon? Let’s have a look at the women’s singles draw.

 

Section One

Section One is one of the more tougher sections of the draw, but in saying that, both Halep and Serena Williams should both make it through to the fourth round to meet in what could be a thrilling encounter. Halep, who lost in the second round in Sydney to Ashleigh Barty, has to overcome Kaia Kanepi in the opening round, while she could meet seven-time Grand Slam champion Venus Williams, or Mihaela Buzărnescu in the third round, while Serena, who won all three of her singles matches at the Hopman Cup, could meet 2014 Wimbledon finalist Eugenie Bouchard in the second round before meeting either Carla Suárez Navarro or 2011 US Open champion Samantha Stosur in the third round.

My fourth round match-up: (1) Simona Halep vs. (16) Serena Williams

 

Section Two

Section Two is another strong section of the draw, and although she could face Camila Giorgi in the third round, Plíšková should have no troubles making the Round of 16, where she could meet either Daria Kasatkina, Johanna Konta, or Garbiñe Muguruza. Konta and Muguruza are slated to meet in the second round, with Kasatkina waiting in the third round should either of them get through.

My fourth round match-up: (18) Garbiñe Muguruza vs. (7) Karolína Plíšková

 

Section Three

Section Three is also another strong section of the women’s draw, but one which you would expect Osaka to survive and at least make it through to the fourth round, although she will need to overcome Daria Gavrilova in second round, and then either two-time Australian Open champion Victoria Azarenka or Hsieh Su-wei in the third round to make it through to meet either Anastasija Sevastova, who made the quarter-finals in Brisbane, or Wang Qiang, who lost to Barty in the final of the WTA Elite Trophy in Zhuhai at the end of last year.

My fourth round match-up: (4) Naomi Osaka vs. (13) Anastasija Sevastova

 

Section Four

Svitolina, who won the WTA Finals last year in Singapore, and 2017 US Open runner-up Madison Keys both feature in this section, and should both make it through to meet each other in the fourth round, but they will need to overcome 2014 Australian Open finalist Dominika Cibulková, and last year’s semi-finalist Elise Mertens in the third round respectively to make it through to the second week.

My fourth round match-up: (17) Madison Keys vs. (6) Elina Svitolina

 

Section Five

Talking about strong sections, Section Five of the draw is the strongest, but one you would expect Kvitová to navigate her way through successfully to meet either Lesia Tsurenko, who made the final in Brisbane, or Aryna Sabalenka, who won the title in Shenzhen, but lost in the first round to Kvitová in Sydney.

However, the two-time Wimbledon champion will have to overcome 2017 Wimbledon semi-finalist Magdaléna Rybáriková in the opening round before meeting 2011 Australian Open and US Open quarter-finalist Andrea Petkovic in the second round before meeting either Belinda Bencic, Kateřina Siniaková, Yulia Putintseva, or Barbora Strýcová in the third round.

My fourth round match-up: (8) Petra Kvitová vs. (24) Lesia Tsurenko

 

Section Six

This section is not particular strong overall, but it has four big names in Wozniacki, 2008 Australian Open champion Maria Sharapova, 2017 Roland Garros champion Jeļena Ostapenko, and Barty, who is in career best form right now after finishing runner up to Kvitová in Sydney. At the moment, you would expect Barty and Wozniacki to make it through to face each other in a fourth round showdown, but before that, Barty will have to overcome Ostapenko, who she beat in the first round in Sydney, or Maria Sakkari in the third round, while the defending champion will have to conquer Sharapova in the same round.

My fourth round match-up: (15) Ashleigh Barty vs. (3) Caroline Wozniacki

 

Section Seven

If Stephens can find her best form, the 2017 US Open champion should have no problems in reaching the fourth round, but that could be a big if as she lost in the first round in Brisbane, second round in Sydney, and has lost in the first round in her last three appearances at Melbourne Park despite making the semi-finals back in 2013. If Stephens does make the Round of 16, she will meet either Anett Kontaveit, who made the quarter-finals in Brisbane, Aliaksandra Sasnovich, who made the semi-finals in Sydney, Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, or 2016 Roland Garros semi-finalist Kiki Bertens.

My fourth round match-up: (5) Sloane Stephens vs. (20) Anett Kontaveit

 

Section Eight

The final section of the draw is a reasonable section, one that 2016 Australian Open champion Kerber should be able to navigate successfully through to meet Julia Görges or Caroline Garcia in the fourth round, but Kerber will need to defeat either Donna Vekić or
Kristina Mladenovic in the third round in order to make it through to the second week.

My fourth round match-up: (14) Julia Görges vs. (2) Angelique Kerber

 

My predicted quarter-final match-ups

(16) Serena Williams vs. (7) Karolína Plíšková

(4) Naomi Osaka vs. (17) Madison Keys

(8) Petra Kvitová vs. (15) Ashleigh Barty

(20) Anett Kontaveit vs. (2) Angelique Kerber

 

My predicted semi-final match-ups

(16) Serena Williams vs. (4) Naomi Osaka

(8) Petra Kvitová vs. (2) Angelique Kerber

 

My predicted final

(16) Serena Williams vs. (8) Petra Kvitová

 

2019 Australian Open champion prediction

(16) Serena Williams

2018 Wimbledon Preview – Ladies’ Singles

The sight of glorious green grass, the sight of delicious strawberries and cream, the embracing of tradition and prestige, a special place with the motto “If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster, and treat those two imposters just the same”.

It is the All England Club, it is Wimbledon, and it is The Championships, and the ladies’ singles championship is the most wide open I have seen in years, possibly ever, with numerous players in the field capable of going deep into the second week.

So, here is a look at the ladies’ singles draw for 2018.

 

Section one

The Roland Garros champion Simona Halep has a comfortable draw in the early rounds before meeting Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova in the third round, and then either Johanna Konta, Dominika Cibulková, or Elise Mertens in the fourth round as Halep looks to complete the Roland Garros-Wimbledon double, which no one outside of Serena Williams (2002, 2015) has achieved since Steffi Graf in 1996, but Halep will have tremendous competition from the quarter-finals and beyond.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (1) Simona Halep vs. (22) Johanna Konta

 

Section two

Two former Wimbledon champions in Maria Sharapova and Petra Kvitová, and the 2017 Roland Garros champion in Jeļena Ostapenko are all in this section of the draw, with Sharapova and Ostapenko set to meet in the third round, before meeting Kvitová in the fourth round in what is a brutal draw for the 2004 champion, while the 2014 champion could face either Daria Gavrilova, Peng Shuai, or Samantha Stosur in the third round before the match-up with Sharapova, but after her title in Birmingham, Kvitová will be very hard to beat here at the All England Club.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (24) Maria Sharapova vs. (8) Petra Kvitová

 

Section three

The defending Wimbledon champion Garbiñe Muguruza has got a good draw in the opening three rounds before meeting Ashleigh Barty in the fourth round, but given Muguruza’s past struggles to back up to play well at the All England Club after performing brilliantly at Roland Garros, where she made the semi-finals this year, she is definitely no certainty to progress beyond the fourth round.

As for Barty, who comes into SW19 in wonderful form after winning in Nottingham, and making the quarter-finals in Eastbourne, has a difficult second round against 2014 finalist Eugenie Bouchard, before a meeting with the young and talented Daria Kasatkina in the third round before a potential “death row” of big hitters as she aims to become the first Australian female to win at Wimbledon since Evonne Goolagong Cawley won as a mother in 1980.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (3) Garbiñe Muguruza vs. (17) Ashleigh Barty

 

Section four

Section four of the ladies’ singles draw is quite simply full of quality, with 2016 finalist Angelique Kerber, rising Japanese star Naomi Osaka, as well as Carla Suárez Navarro, Belinda Bencic, and Caroline Garcia, but in saying this, there is the potential for plenty of upsets in this section, but I think Osaka, who made the semi-finals in Nottingham, and Garcia, who made the quarter-finals in Mallorca, are the in-form players here.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (18) Naomi Osaka vs. (6) Caroline Garcia

 

Section five

Talking about sections loaded with quality, there is huge amount of talent here with 2016 US Open finalist Karolína Plíšková, two-time Australian Open champion Victoria Azarenka, rising star Aryna Sabalenka, Romanian player Mihaela Buzărnescu, 2016 Roland Garros semi-finalist Kiki Bertens, and five-time Wimbledon champion and last year’s finalist Venus Williams, who has been knocked out in the opening round of the first two Grand Slams in 2018.

While I will pick Williams to go through to at least the fourth round on reputation alone, I am going to pick a Belarusian to face her in the fourth round, but not the one you would expect, and she will be arguably one of the big stories of The Championships in 2018.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: Aryna Sabalenka vs. (9) Venus Williams

 

Section six

This section features last year’s US Open champion, and this year’s Roland Garros finalist in Sloane Stephens, and Julia Görges, who made the quarter-finals in Birmingham, and despite a tough first round encounter against Donna Vekić, who made the semi-finals in Nottingham, I am picking Stephens to make the fourth round (and probably the quarter-finals beyond that) based on reputation alone, and if she plays to her potential, anything is possible, but I think her level will be just a touch shy of that level here.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (13) Julia Görges vs. (4) Sloane Stephens

 

Section seven

23-time Grand Slam champion Serena Williams is in this section of the draw, and has been given a seeding from the seeding committee despite getting into Wimbledon via a protected ranking following her return after giving birth to daughter Alexis Olympia Ohanian, and has a comfortable start before meeting Elina Svitolina in the third round, and fellow American and 2017 US Open finalist Madison Keys in the Round of 16, whose toughest challenge on-route to meeting Williams will be last year’s Wimbledon semi-finalist Magdaléna Rybáriková in the third round.

Keys, in my opinion, is primed to go deep here after making the quarter-finals at the Australian Open, and the semi-finals at Roland Garros. A real contender!

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (25) Serena Williams vs. (10) Madison Keys

 

Section eight

Australian Open champion Caroline Wozniacki is in the very bottom section of the draw, and has found some great form on grass, winning in Eastbourne, but has never made the quarter-finals at the All England Club, being knocked out in the fourth round on six occasions (2009, 2010, 2011, 2014, 2015, 2017), but has a good draw in the opening two rounds before meeting 2012 Wimbledon finalist Agnieszka Radwańska in the third round, who has not made a Grand Slam quarter-final since the 2016 Australian Open, when she made the semi-finals, before meeting CoCo Vandeweghe in the fourth round, who has had a disappointing year, winning 10 of her 20 matches.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (16) CoCo Vandeweghe vs. (2) Caroline Wozniacki

 

My predicted quarter-final match-ups

(1) Simona Halep vs. (8) Petra Kvitová

(17) Ashleigh Barty vs. (18) Naomi Osaka

Aryna Sabalenka vs. (4) Sloane Stephens

(10) Madison Keys vs. (2) Caroline Wozniacki

 

My predicted semi-final match-ups

(8) Petra Kvitová vs. (17) Ashleigh Barty

Aryna Sabalenka vs. (10) Madison Keys

 

My predicted final match-ups

(17) Ashleigh Barty vs. (10) Madison Keys

 

My predicted 2018 Wimbledon champion

(17) Ashleigh Barty

2018 Roland Garros Preview – Men’s Singles

After a clay court season where one man, that man, has dominated, winning 17 of his 18 matches on-route to claiming his 11th title in Monte-Carlo, his 11th title in Barcelona, and his eighth title in Rome, with his only blemish being a loss in the quarter-finals in Madrid to Dominic Thiem.

And with his great rival in Roger Federer sitting out the clay court season for a second-straight year, can anyone stop Rafael Nadal from claiming an astonishing 11th title at Roland Garros, and a 17th Grand Slam title overall to move to within three of Federer’s record of 20?

So, let’s have a look at the men’s singles draw for Roland Garros 2018!

Section one

Of course this section of the draw features Nadal, who needs to defend his crown to retain the No.1 ranking, and while there are a couple of potential dangers that at their best could give Nadal trouble, most notably Denis Shapovalov, who made the semi-finals in Madrid, and perhaps Jack Sock, who has had a poor start to the year with just five wins from 15 matches. However, I cannot see either of them, let alone anyone else in this draw defeating him this year at Roland Garros.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (1) Rafael Nadal vs. (24) Denis Shapovalov

 

Section two

Section Two is a wide-open section featuring Diego Schwartzman, Borna Ćorić, Philipp Kohlschreiber, Feliciano López, who will equal Roger Federer’s record of 65-consecutive Grand Slam appearances, and Kevin Anderson, who are all capable of going deep here, but none of whom have reached the quarter-finals before at Roland Garros, with the best results being fourth rounds from Kohlschreiber (2009, 2013), López (2004), and Anderson (2014, 2015, 2017)!

However, in terms of form, Schwartzman (18 wins from 30 matches) and Anderson (20 wins from 28 matches) are clearly to two most in-form players in 2018 from this section, and without any truly obvious selections, one of these two will meet Nadal in the quarter-finals!

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (11) Diego Schwartzman vs. (6) Kevin Anderson

 

Section three

This section of the draw is also an interesting section, but one that contains a clear three standouts in Marin Čilić, who made the quarter-finals in Monte-Carlo and the semi-finals in Rome, Fabio Fognini, who made the quarter-finals in Rome, and Kyle Edmund, who made the quarter-finals in Madrid, as well as the final in Marrakesh, and the quarter-finals in Estoril before that.

While I expect Čilić to make the fourth round, it will be a tough third round battle to decide who will meet him in the round of 16, one that the Italian will be favoured to win over the Brit.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (3) Marin Čilić vs. (18) Fabio Fognini

 

Section four

If Juan Martín del Potro is fit and healthy, he can go deep into this French Open, but has only played four matches during the clay court season as he struggles to overcome a groin injury, but as long as he is right, he will at least make the fourth round where he will meet either John Isner, who made the quarter-finals in Madrid, or Tomáš Berdych, who lost in the first round in Monte-Carlo, Madrid, and Rome, but is capable of producing on the big stage.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (9) John Isner vs. (5) Juan Martín del Potro

 

Section five

In section five of the draw, David Goffin is the clear favourite to at least make the fourth round, if not the quarter-finals, after quarter-final appearances in Monte-Carlo and Rome, as well as making the semi-finals in Barcelona, but who he could meet in the fourth round is an interesting prospect! He could meet either Nick Kyrgios, who hasn’t played for over a month as he attempts to overcome an elbow injury, but is capable of finding form at short notice, or Pablo Carreño Busta, who made the semi-finals in Barcelona, as well as in Estoril, and looks to be in good form!

Kyrgios will face fellow Australian Bernard Tomic in the opening round in what could be an encounter full of tension!

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (8) David Goffin vs. (10) Pablo Carreño Busta

 

Section six

Section six contains the 2016 champion Novak Djokovic, who seems to be finding some form after a poor start to the season in his troubles from coming back from an elbow injury (10 wins from 17 matches) after making the semi-finals in Madrid, but faces a tough draw here, potentially facing David Ferrer in the second round, Roberto Bautista Agut in the third round, and Grigor Dimitrov or Fernando Verdasco in the fourth round, but in saying that, other than Dimitrov, who made the semi-finals in Monte-Carlo and the quarter-finals in Barcelona, looks the most in-form player here!

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (20) Novak Djokovic vs. (4) Grigor Dimitrov

 

Section seven

Dominic Thiem is in this section of the draw, the only man to defeat Nadal during this clay court season, and has made the semi-finals here for the last two years, but while he is the favoured player in this section, he faces a tough second round match-up with the Greek teenage sensation Stefanos Tsitsipas, who made the final in Barcelona, and the semi-finals in Estoril, before he can make a smooth passage through to the fourth round to probably face Kei Nishikori, who made the final in Monte-Carlo, and the quarter-finals in Rome on his comeback from a wrist injury suffered before the US Open last year.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (7) Dominic Thiem vs. (19) Kei Nishikori

 

Section eight

The 2015 champion Stan Wawrinka is in this section of the draw, but comes into the French Open in such poor form (three wins from eight matches), and his first round loss in Rome was his first match in just under three months in his struggles to overcome his knee problems.

The only player I can trust in this section is Alexander Zverev, who has been in amazing form, winning in Munich and Madrid, but also making the semi-finals in Monte-Carlo, and the final in Rome off the back in winning in Madrid. In my view, Zverev is the only player I truly believe can trouble (or beat) Nadal this year at Roland Garros!

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (15) Lucas Pouille vs. (2) Alexander Zverev

 

My predicted quarter-final match-ups

(1) Rafael Nadal vs. (11) Diego Schwartzman

(3) Marin Čilić vs. (5) Juan Martín del Potro

(8) David Goffin vs. (20) Novak Djokovic

(7) Dominic Thiem vs. (2) Alexander Zverev

 

My predicted semi-final match-ups

(1) Rafael Nadal vs. (5) Juan Martín del Potro

(8) David Goffin vs. (2) Alexander Zverev

 

My predicted final match-ups

(1) Rafael Nadal vs. (2) Alexander Zverev

 

My predicted 2018 Roland Garros champion

(1) Rafael Nadal

2018 Roland Garros Preview – Women’s Singles

In a clay court season that has been wide open, we head now to Roland Garros for the 2018 French Open with a wide open field of contenders for the title, looking to knock defending champion Jeļena Ostapenko, who won her first career title here last year against Simona Halep, off her perch!

In addition to this, six players (Simona Halep, Caroline Wozniacki, Garbiñe Muguruza, Elina Svitolina, Karolína Plíšková and Caroline Garcia) are in contention to either retain or gain the world No.1 ranking by the end of the championship.

So, who will win at Roland Garros in 2018? Let’s have a look at the women’s singles draw!

Section one

Section One contains last year’s finalist and the No.1 seed Simona Halep, and given her consistent form, quarter-finals in Stuttgart and Madrid, as well as making the final in Rome, she is certainly the one to beat in this section, and will most likely meet either Daria Gavrilova or Elise Mertens in the fourth round.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (1) Simona Halep vs. (24) Daria Gavrilova

 

Section two

Caroline Garcia has been arguably the most consistent player during the clay-court season, making the semi-finals in both Stuttgart and Madrid, as well as the quarter-finals in Rome, and should make it through to the fourth round for a likely meeting with Angelique Kerber, despite Kerber going out of the opening round at Roland Garros the last two years!

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (12) Angelique Kerber vs. (7) Caroline Garcia

 

Section three

Garbiñe Muguruza has struggled for form during the clay-court season (two wins from four matches), but I can’t see anyone stopping her from making the fourth round where she will likely meet CoCo Vandeweghe, who made the final in Stuttgart, and is capable of doing some damage if she gets on a roll!

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (3) Garbiñe Muguruza vs. (15) CoCo Vandeweghe

 

Section four

This is a really interesting section with 23-time Grand Slam champion Serena Williams returning to play her first grand slam after the birth of her first child, five-time Grand Slam champion Maria Sharapova continuing her redemption story from a drugs suspension, and with other standout players in Karolína Plíšková, Ashleigh Barty, and Julia Görges.

Both Sharapova and Plíšková should meet in the third round in what will be a blockbuster match-up, and while I respect her record, I don’t think Williams is in good shape at the moment, and I think either Barty or Görges will meet either Sharapova or Plíšková in the fourth round.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (17) Ashleigh Barty vs. (28) Maria Sharapova

 

Section five

The defending champion Jeļena Ostapenko is in this section of the draw, and after making the quarter-finals in Stuttgart and Rome, looks like a strong tip to go through to the fourth round after a difficult second round match against two-time Grand Slam champion Victoria Azarenka.

Johanna Konta is also in this section of the draw, along with seven-time Grand Slam champion Venus Williams, with the winner of their third round encounter to meet the defending champion in the round of 16.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (5) Jeļena Ostapenko vs. (9) Venus Williams

 

Section six

After making the quarter-finals in Stuttgart and winning in Rome, Elina Svitolina is a strong chance of going deep at Roland Garros, and will likely meet either Madison Keys, who won two matches in Rome, or Naomi Osaka, who won a match in Rome, in the fourth round.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (13) Madison Keys vs. (4) Elina Svitolina

 

Section seven

Petra Kvitová has been in strong form during the clay-court season, winning in Prague and Madrid, and while she isn’t renowned for being strong on clay, making the semi-finals at Roland Garros just once (2012), you sense she has the right draw to go deep here, and will likely face last year’s US Open champion Sloane Stephens, or Anastasija Sevastova in the round of 16.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (8) Petra Kvitová vs. (10) Sloane Stephens

 

Section eight

The 2018 Australian Open champion Caroline Wozniacki is the strongest player in the final section of the draw, and despite some underwhelming performances during the clay-court season, with best results being quarter-finals in Istanbul and Rome, I think she can go deep at Roland Garros, where she has made the quarter-finals twice (2010, 2017).

Wozniacki will likely meet either Russian youngster Daria Kasatkina, or Spanish veteran Carla Suárez Navarro, who both made the quarter-finals in Madrid.

 

My predicted fourth round match-up: (14) Daria Kasatkina vs. (2) Caroline Wozniacki

 

My predicted quarter-final match-ups

(1) Simona Halep vs. (7) Caroline Garcia

(3) Garbiñe Muguruza vs. (28) Maria Sharapova

(5) Jeļena Ostapenko vs. (4) Elina Svitolina

(8) Petra Kvitová vs. (2) Caroline Wozniacki

 

My predicted semi-final match-ups

(1) Simona Halep vs. (28) Maria Sharapova

(4) Elina Svitolina vs. (2) Caroline Wozniacki

 

My predicted final match-ups

(1) Simona Halep vs. (4) Elina Svitolina

 

My predicted 2018 Roland Garros champion

(1) Simona Halep