My review of the Fifth Ashes Test

Australia have finished the 2017-18 Ashes Series in the best way possible after defeating England by an innings and 123 runs in the fifth and final test match of the series at the Sydney Cricket Ground (SCG) to win the series four-nil.

After a rain delay which wiped out the scheduled opening session of the test match, England started off well after winning the toss and electing to bat first, reaching 3/122 at tea, and were 3/228 before Joe Root got out just 17 runs short of a 14th Test match century, and a elusive century in the series after building a 133-run partnership with Dawid Malan for the fourth wicket. After Jonny Bairstow elected to come out to bat late on Day One (instead of a nightwatchman), he got out for five caught behind thanks to some good bowling from Josh Hazlewood on what proved to be the last ball of Day One to be 5/233 after 81.4 overs.

From 3/228, England proceeded to lose 7/118 to be all out for 346, a total which proved to be nowhere near enough as Australia began to assert their authority over the test match. However, England did start well, knocking over Cameron Bancroft for a duck, but that joy was soon short lived as the next five batsmen went onto score 50 or more, with three of them making hundreds. Surprisingly, David Warner and Steve Smith weren’t one of those three.

Warner, who was looking for his fourth Test century in his last four test matches at the SCG got out caught behind by Bairstow off the bowling of James Anderson for 56 as England once again contained his normal fast rate of run-scoring.

Smith, who scored the 26 runs necessary to become the equal-second fastest batsman (111 innings) to 6,000 Test match runs, joining Sir Garfield Sobers, and with only Sir Donald Bradman ahead of those two in the record books, fell 17 runs short of a fourth century for the series, which would have equalled Bradman’s record for most centuries in a single Ashes series, and would have equalled Smith’s own tally of four centuries in any test series, which he achieved against India back in 2014-15.

Smith also fell 13 runs short of a remarkable 700 runs for the series, scoring 687 runs at an average of 137.40, which was 242 runs more than the next best batsman from either Australia or England.

For once, Warner and Smith weren’t the main stars of the show, with Usman Khawaja, Shaun Marsh and Mitchell Marsh all scoring centuries, important not only for Australia, but important for themselves.

Khawaja reached his sixth Test match century, which was his first since November 2016, scoring 171 as he went past 2,000 runs in his Test match career. Now, it is up to the selectors to keep faith in Khawaja in all conditions and believe that he is the best number three batsman in Australia on all pitches. However, if I did have a suggestion for Khawaja to remove the perception that he lacks a presence at the crease, I would suggest that Khawaja needs to work a lot harder at his fitness, as he has had injury troubles in the past with knees and hamstrings, which may give him more confidence within himself, and give the sense that he has a greater presence when he bats.

Shaun Marsh also reached his sixth Test match century, scoring 156 to finally fulfilling his immense talent, while younger brother Mitchell Marsh made his second Test match century, scoring 101 to cement his spot in the team going forward to South Africa in an innings that was powerful and brutal. In addition to this, Shaun and Mitchell became the fifth set of brothers to score centuries in the same innings in Test match cricket, joining Ian and Greg Chappell, who achieved this feat three times, Steve and Mark Waugh, who did this twice, while Mushtaq and Sadiq Mohammad, and Grant and Andy Flower each did this on one occasion.

As a result, Australia declared at 7/649, and from there, England were no chance of forcing any kind of result, and despite a brave, and in some ways courageous performance by England captain Joe Root, scoring 58 despite retiring ill on two occasions throughout that innings suffering from the symptoms of viral gastroenteritis, and spending some hours in hospital in an attempt to treat the condition, England were bowled out for 180 to lose the test match, and the series convincingly.

However, the summer of cricket is still far from over, with five one day internationals (ODIs) between Australia and England, as well as a Twenty20 (T20) triangular series between Australia, England, and New Zealand, with matches being played in both Australia and New Zealand, with all of these matches sure to produce exciting, entertaining cricket that will leave us on the edges of our seats, and produce some close results!

I predict Australia to win the ODI series 4-1, but for either England or New Zealand to win the T20 triangular series.

 

My review of the Fourth Ashes Test

The fourth Ashes Test match of the 2017-18 Ashes Series, the Boxing Day Test match will be a test match that won’t be remembered fondly by many people as it turned into being a dull draw due in most part to the drop-in pitch at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG)

Australia won the toss and elected to bat first, and both Cameron Bancroft and David Warner put on an opening partnership of 122 before Bancroft fell leg before wicket off the bowling of Chris Woakes for 26, before David Warner brought up his 21st Test century the ball after getting caught at mid-on on a no-ball off the bowling of debutant Tom Curran.

After Warner (103) and Usman Khawaja (17) both got out, Steve Smith and Shaun Marsh put on a 100-run stand for the fourth wicket before Curran officially got his first Test match wicket after Smith chopped-on for 76. From there, Australia lost 7/67 to be all out for 327, a score well-below what Australia was expecting with Shaun Marsh (61) being the only other player to pass 50.

From there the match changed, and Alastair Cook was the star of the show, scoring the highest score by a player who has “carried the bat” in the history of Test match cricket, 244 not out as he regained the form that has seen him approach the 12,000-run milestone in Test match cricket, and is now the sixth-highest run-scorer in the history of Test match cricket, surpassing¬†Mahela Jayawardene,¬†Shivnarine Chanderpaul, and Brian Lara during that wonderful innings at the MCG.

In terms of other contributions for England, Joe Root got out on 61, which is the fifth time in a row that Root has failed to go onto make a century after reaching 50, while Stuart Broad made 56, surpassing the 100-run milestone in the series as England got bowled out for 491.

From there, the chances of an Australian victory and a five-nil whitewash were all but gone. However, Australia managed to save the match comfortably in the end thanks to the Australian captain Smith (102 not out) as he surpassed 600 runs in the series, and his deputy Warner (86), who missed out becoming just the third batsman to score centuries in each innings of a Test match held at the MCG.

However, the talk towards the end of the match, and certainly afterwards, was the pitch, and the supposed lack of life in the pitch for anyone to truly succeed on, which meant neither Australia or England could make a realistic push for victory.

In my view, the pitch offered variable pace and bounce, but it was only subtle, which meant it was difficult for the bowlers to take wickets, and the batsmen to score runs. There was little encouragement for the spinners as the match progressed, which meant no team could progress the match forward to force a positive result.

Overall, when you consider the facts, it was a below average pitch, and something needs to be done to make sure drop-in pitches perform more closely to the characteristics of a normal pitch.

I don’t think the MCG needs to rip up their drop-in pitches to start again, but I think the answer to “naturalise” the drop-in pitch lies below the pitch, at the bottom of the pitch rather than on the surface of it, and I think the bottom of the pitch needs to be softened and broken-up a little bit to get the types of pitches that people are looking for.

In addition to this, the MCG drop-in pitches should be installed at a lower-level ground during the winter months to allow the traffic of different sports, such as Australian rules football, rugby league, rugby union, and/or football to run over it to make the pitches more natural and maybe a touch softer. However, getting a club(s) to agree to having these pitches installed at their ground during the winter months will take a lot of convincing, and not too many, if any, would agree to such a strong request.

So, while the drop-in pitch debate continues, Australia and England head to the Sydney Cricket Ground (SCG) for the final test match of the series with Steve Smith just 26 runs away from reaching 6,000 Test match runs, and if he does it in the first innings of the match, he will be the equal second-fastest (along with Sir Garfield Sobers) to reach the milestone in the history of test match cricket, in terms of innings.

David Warner will be aiming to score his fourth test match century in as many matches at the SCG, while Stuart Broad is currently two wickets away from 400 in Test match cricket.

The pitch at the SCG will be under scrutiny since it hasn’t hosted a first-class match this season, but historically, it has been a pitch that has always turned, and has also been a pitch that has been good for batting.

I think Australia will bounce-back from a difficult Boxing Day Test match to win the final test match of the series in Sydney to claim the series four-nil.